Why This Orgasm Bible Could Liberate The Female Pleasure Taboo

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They say we’ve never been more progressive. They may be right, but apparently in a system fuelled by pink-faced penis-owners there are still a lot of things to work out when it comes to female pleasure, in particular masturbation. The female orgasm, in all its centuries of mystery still remains a vastly taboo topic and gals getting off just isn’t talked about enough. Unless you’re one of my friends.

Pop culture routinely likes to discriminate against vaginas – cisgender female pleasure is habitually condemned by movie certification boards in comparison to males’ and female nudity is often branded more offensive than violence. But most worrying is the thought that there are actual girls and boys out there who don’t know how to work a clitoris. If this is true – and rumour has it, it is – that sucks.

natalie portman bath

(Image: Fox Searchlight Pictures)

Kirby Dick’s eye-opening 2006 documentary This Film Is Not Yet Rated uncovered the US film board MPAA ‘s tendencies to give movies showing women receiving oral pleasure much higher ratings than those with men getting off. Other than the possibility of female cumming faces (acted ones) being considerably more terrifying than men’s, we call this sexism.

Even though Diary of a Teenage Girl was aimed at legit teen girls to encourage education surrounding sexuality, the flick was unfairly certified by the British Board of Film Classification as an 18. Let me emphasise who it was made for: teenage girls. The movie’s directer Marielle Heller condemned the all-male panel for being biased against women’s sexuality, when boys are taught from the off that “whatever they feel sexually is normal”.

This isn’t an isolated situation. Strangely, women are more likely to be shown on-screen naked, but this usually means no sign of a vulva. Not even a flash of pubes is normal. Yet it’s totally acceptable to show a copious amount of breasts (providing they’re sexy ones) for viewers to lap up but any undertones of girls exploring sexuality or – god forbid – experiencing a sexual awakening (as illustrated in Diary of a Teenage Girl), society is unreasonably partisan.

An educational startup might be about to curb this culture of double standards and redefine how we view sex with teachings on the perplexing universe of the female climax. It’s here: a bible for clit dummies.

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Chick-Chat: To Erase Slut Shaming, We Have To Get Sluttier

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When did being slutty get so bad? When did sticking your butt out in clubs get so dirty? When did wearing heels and hot pants become synonymous with sex? Why does wearing fishnets translate to “I wanna fuck”? Why does the word ‘slut’ make my mum wince?

We’ve got a catch 22 issue that isn’t fading: if a girl doesn’t have sex, she’s a nun; if she’s promiscuous, she’s a slut. Despite numerous think pieces and global campaigns to miraculously bust slut shaming altogether, it’s still rampant and infecting everyone’s knickers.

Being slutty ain’t a bad thing! (Photo: Ellen Von Unwerth)

Being slutty ain’t a bad thing! (Photo: Ellen Von Unwerth)

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A Love Letter To Neil From ‘Art Attack’ On Its 25th Birthday

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He hasn’t got back to my email yet but I’m assuming he’s reading the countless other love letters he’s sure to be receiving on this grand day. While I feel really old that one of the best kids shows from the 90s is now hitting its 25 year anniversary, it’s impossible not to look back on all the good pritt-sticky times Art Attack and its poster paint poster boy brought us.

Airing its first episode on June 15, 1990, the CITV (oh, the nostalgia) show penned by Neil Buchanan, who knew what was and what wasn’t an “art attack”, the important years of our childhood could now be spent making crocodiles out of paper mache and gazing as our favourite art presenter showed us how to fill our house with crap that dripped PVA glue onto our mum’s precious furniture.

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Hot boys smoking weed

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One half of model power couple Jarlos introduces a new zine celebrating the highest holiday of the year

weed

4/20. A countercultural holiday celebrating cannabis culture and stoners gathering in their hundreds to do what they do best: smoke weed. In honour of the global phenomenon, HIGH, a new zine from Carlos Santolalla, the multi-talented millennial model, DJ and one-half of models-of-the-moment couple Jarlos, is being released. Born out of his photo project snapping hot guys breathing in some good old THC, the California Bay-native tells us he is naturally inclined to the subject, feeling hot stoned guys are something that the world deserves to see. “Marijuana culture has been ingrained with me since I was a closeted homo in high school,” he says. “I always thought marijuana turned me gay. The first time I ever hooked up with a boy was because he rolled a perfect blunt for me and I found that to be an extremely attractive talent.”

The zine contains photos of such aforementioned gorgeous stoned boys embedded amongst important facts about the beneficial legalisation of marijuana, in the hope to clarify stoners aren’t bad people – as well as educate the wider population, and naysayers, on their culture. Santolalla explains: “The war on drugs isn’t meant for all drugs and in this case it’s a huge misuse of resources. The mistreatment of peaceful, casual weed smokers in America is downright amoral.”

Read the rest here.

Can New Fashion Truly Be Ethical?

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It’s been an issue I’ve slowly but surely been coming to terms with, but simultaneously been pretty fucking confused by. Can we enjoy fashion and buy clothes without contributing to the labyrinthian structure of exploitation in the clothing industry? Is it possible to buy clothes that don’t harm anyone in their making?

Two years ago today, 1,133 people died and 2,500 were injured following the collapse of the Rana Plaza commercial complex in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka. Despite recommendations from the day before, advising the building’s bosses to have an expert examination into cracks that had been lamenting on the factory’s walls, the staff were ordered to work. By midday the building collapsed with thousands inside. The DNA of 135 victims has still not been found.

Read the rest on Konbini here.

Diet Pills & Beach Bodies: The Danger of Obsession

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The quest for the perfect body isn’t a modern idea. For centuries women have experienced pressure to maintain an admirable figure – from whalebone corsets designed to accentuate an hourglass silhouette in the Victorian era, to clinched in waists in the 50s. Bodily pressures have travelled with us through time, and we seem to be more obsessed now than ever.

On April 12th, 21 year old Eloise Aimee Parry died after taking more than the recommended dose of her slimming pills, which actually contained industrial chemical dinitrophenol (DNP), which is used in pesticides and unsafe for human consumption. Coroners said as she died, she ‘burned from the inside’.

Read the rest on Konbini here.

Meet Charlie Craggs: The Activist Revolutionising Transphobia

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Every 29 hours a trans person is murdered. Only two weeks ago Mexican transgender escort Vanessa Santillan was tragically murdered by strangulation in a flat in Fulham. It’s estimated that from more than 1.6 million homeless youth, 20-40% are trans. What is even more worrying is 41% of trans people are reported to have attempted suicide according to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey – and some gut-wrenchingly succeed.

Because of rampant discrimination against transgender adults and youth, dealing with day-to-day life can be a struggle in itself, leading to many trans people experiencing unbearable insults, unfair treatment and, as we have seen, worse.

Nothing is solved without action, however, as Charlie Craggs, a trans activist will tell you. The creative director and self-proclaimed council-estate girl has seen her fair share of unlawful bullying and hate, but, under a firm assurance transphobia can be eradicated, through getting on with it and fighting for change.

Read on here.

Thousands take to London’s streets in UN anti-racism protest

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Dazed joins the protesters trying to stamp out British hate in the face of rising prejudice

Photography by: Stephanie Wilson

Photography by: Stephanie Wilson

You’d have to be pretty much blind not to see that discrimination is on the rise in the UK. With anti-Muslim hate crime rising 65 per cent in London alone and a tenfold increase in attacks on Polish people in the UK, it’s clear that xenophobia, racism and Islamophobia is alive and well in today’s Britain. This Saturday, thousands of protesters took a stand against hate in London to mark UN Anti-Racism Day.

The demonstration, organised by several groups including London Black Revs, Stand Up To Racism and Unite Against Fascism, saw a huge turnout of people from all backgrounds, religions and races. Protesters arrived in unison, having marched from Portland Place, chanting, “Shut it down! No human is illegal!” as they waved banners reading “stand up to racism and fascism”, “#BlackLivesMatter”, “austerity breeds fascism” and more.

Read on here.